Foreigners in the Village

Posted by on Mar 27, 2014 | No Comments

Here is an excerpt from a World Racer, Sophia Nalty, on her experience working with a CCC pastor in his village. Read the full blog here

This month my team and I are guests of a village pastor and his family of 14. His two teenage sons, 13 and 14 years old respectively, serve as our translators. His wife and the 10 orphan girls they house (aged 6-9 years old) make our stay as comfortable as possible. The concrete house is divided into two stories, one large room on each floor. We sleep in tents on the second floor and their home is on the first.

We share an open bathroom in the back of the house on their floor. We flush and bathe with buckets. The food is jam-packed with flavor, spice, CARBS, and unusual textures…diarrhea is inevitable. There’s nothing quite as humbling as doing the “doo” in a house where the inside dividing walls are only about 6 ft tall…or outside in the middle of the night when you don’t want to disturb the family. We wake up at dawn whether we want to or not because the whole village comes alive as the sun rises. And in such a communal culture, privacy is not common. We’re often prone to spontaneous visits from the locals or the children, some of whom who have never seen Westerners (especially those with paler skin), who may enter our room at anytime to take pictures with us or just peer at us in our tents. We were even featured in a local newspaper when we visited a neighboring village for miscellaneous shopping.

Despite all these adjustments, I know that this is the best place for me to be. It’s hard to explain even as I sit and write about it, weighing the pros and cons… There’s just something about the “bush”. Away from the hustle and bustle of the city. The peacefulness of open air. Nights just filled with stars like the Lord showed to Abraham in the Old Testament. Here we have the time and quiet to seek the Lord individually and as a team about everything from ministry (which is so AMAZING, I’ll have to write a separate blog about it), our own faith-walks, and preparing to come back home. Not that there wasn’t time before, but the distractions are simply way less weighing. Don’t get me wrong, by no means am I planning on heading for the boondocks when I get home, but I’m definitely thanking God for this change of pace.

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